Sections
- I
- II
- III
- IV
- V
- VI
- VII
- VIII
- IX
- X
- XI
- XII
- XIII
- XIV
- XV
- XVI
- XVII
- XVIII
- XIX
- XX
- XXI
- XXII
- XXIII
- XXIV
- XXV
- XXVI
- XXVII
- XXVIII
- XXIX
- XXX
- XXXI
- XXXII
- XXXIII
- XXXIV
- XXXV
- XXXVI
- XXXVII
- XXXVIII
- XXXIX
- XL
- XLI
- Source Info

XI

Sung

Because Count Garin now saw
that his son Aucassin
could not let go
of Nicolette of the luminous face,
he imprisoned him
in an underground dungeon
made of grey marble.
As soon as Aucassin arrived there,
he experienced the greatest pain of his life;
he began to lament
in this way, you can hear:
"Nicolette, fleur de lis,
my sweet friend with luminous face,
you are sweeter than a grape
or a loaf of bread soaked in a wooden bowl.
The other day I saw a pilgrim,
native to Limousin,
who was suffering from madness,
and lay at the foot of a bed,
in a sorry state
and gravely ill.
You passed in front of his bed,
you lifted your veil,
your fur-trimmed tunic,
your white linen shift,
he saw your beautiful leg so well:
cured, the pilgrim
recovered his sanity more completely than ever.
He got out of bed,
returned to his country,
in good health and completely cured.
My sweet friend, fleur de lis,
so beautiful when you come and go!
so beautiful when you play and jest!
so beautiful in conversation and pleasure!
so sweet in your kisses and your embraces!
No one could hate you.
It is for you that I am imprisoned
in this underground dungeon
where I make such a noise;
I will now have to die,
for you, my friend."

< Prev  |  Next >

Contributed by: