Sections
- I
- II
- III
- IV
- V
- VI
- VII
- VIII
- IX
- X
- XI
- XII
- XIII
- XIV
- XV
- XVI
- XVII
- XVIII
- XIX
- XX
- XXI
- XXII
- XXIII
- XXIV
- XXV
- XXVI
- XXVII
- XXVIII
- XXIX
- XXX
- XXXI
- XXXII
- XXXIII
- XXXIV
- XXXV
- XXXVI
- XXXVII
- XXXVIII
- XXXIX
- XL
- XLI
- Source Info

XX

Spoken: Story and Dialogue

You heard how Nicolette finished the hut: it was very beautiful and becoming, covered outside and in with flowers and leaves. She hid herself nearby, in a thicket, to see what Aucassin would do.

However, the news that Nicolette was lost spread throughout the country: some said she had run away, other said that Count Garin had her killed. If there were any who took joy in that rumor, Aucassin was not happy.

Count Garin his father ordered him freed, invited the knights and ladies of the land, organized a lavish party in the hopes of consoling his son Aucassin.

But, when the party was in full swing, Aucassin stayed leaning against a railing, very sad and worn out. The others had completely abandoned themselves in joyful celebrating, Aucassin was not jealous because he didn't see anything that pleased him. A knight looked at him, went over and addressed himself to him:

"Aucassin," he said, "I have suffered the same pain as you. I'll give you a good piece of advice, if you wish to take it."

"Lord," replied Aucassin, "thank you very much. I place great value in good advice."

"Mount your horse," he said, "and go distract yourself out by the edge of the forest; you will see flowers and plants, you will hear the little birds singing; you might hear something that will do you good."

"Lord," said Aucassin, "thank you very much. I will do so."

He slipped out of the room, went down the steps, went to the stable where his horse was; he put on the saddle and bit and, using the stirrup, he mounted and left the chateau. By riding along, he reached the forest and his ride took him to the spring where, at three o'clock exactly, he found the child shepherds who had spread out a cloak on the grass and were eating their bread in joy and happiness.

< Prev  |  Next >

Contributed by: